Our Strategy for 2008-2018

Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership
Strategy 2008 - 2018

For a colour copy please email us on beaconp@hotmail.com

Charity Number 1091346
Beacon Enterprise Ltd Company Number 5984845

 


Contents


Executive summary 3
Background 5
The beginning of the partnership 5
A staggering impact 6
The Partnership 2005 - 2007 7
Pursuing sustainability, increasing enterprise 9
Our community in statistics 10
2007 Strategic Consultation and review 12
Tenants and residents' priorities - summaries of each of the four Neighbourhood Plans for the area 12
Laburnum 12
Old Hill 12
Penwerris 13
Trescobeas 13
The Common Themes in the four neighbourhood plans 13
Activity surveys 13
The Voice 13
The IT Suite 14
Agencies and stakeholders 14
Summary of current issues for the area 14
Priorities of agencies and stakeholders for the area 16
Analysis 18
Partnership review (purpose, membership, activities) 18
SWOT analysis 19
PEST analysis 20
3 - 5 year core budget forecasting 22
Cost-benefit analysis 23
Cost options analysis 23
Needs analysis 23
Going Forward Together 25
Conclusions 25
What we must do 25
A decade of action 27
Impact assessment and output forecast for 2008 - 2013 27
Appendices 30
Appendix 1 - Graphs and statistical evidence 30
Appendix 2 - the neighbourhood plans common theme table 31
Appendix 3 - Results of agency & stakeholder consultation: priorities and measures for the Beacon area 32


Developed by J Chappel, G Impey, and G Whitfield, for the Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership

February 2008
Executive summary


In 1996 the Penwerris ward was ranked as the 6th most deprived ward in Cornwall and fell within the worst 10 wards in Cornwall for Income, Employment, Health, Housing and Child Poverty. In 1996 Penwerris, which included Old Hill and the Beacon estates, had:
• The highest proportion of ‘poor' households in the county
• 19/23 county child protection registrations
• 50% of homes without central heating
• 1/3 of households living in poverty
• Unemployment rates were 30 & the national average.

A partnership was formed in 1997 to support and administer the proceeds from the Capital Challenge Pilot Scheme Bid for Action for Energy of £1.2m (This was topped up by a further £1m by Carrick District Council). The bid by residents and Carrick District Council considerably enhanced the energy efficiency of housing in the area of Falmouth known as Old Hill and the Beacon (within Penwerris Ward).

The Partnership continues to play a critical role maintaining and improving relations between the major public service providers, education, health, police, housing and the local councils and the community. The Beacon Partnership consists of: Four Tenant and Resident groups (Penwerris TRA, Old Hill Community Association, Laburnum Close TRA, Oakfield and Acacia TRA) plus Devon and Cornwall Police, Falmouth Youth Club, Carrick District Council, Mid Cornwall Primary Care Trust, Falmouth primary School, with representatives from each forming the Partnership Committee.

The Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership is a registered charity, and it aims to provide services and support to the tenants and residents of the Beacon area at little or no cost. In 2006 BCRP raised funding from Objective One and The National Lottery to establish a company limited by guarantee to support our objects and financial sustainability. At present the rules governing this funding do not allow a profit to be made. Therefore the earliest we forecast the Enterprise to make any profit will be 2010.

The cost of the current project and activities per annum is £52,000 and current funding finishes 31st July 2008.

In 2007 the Partnership celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The culmination of agreed major changes to local council structure and the end of key funding in 2008 prompted a strategic review for the Partnership. This review incorporated a reassessment of the Partnership's objects and activities as well as purpose for being.

To date the Partnership has brought in nearly £1m in additional funding to undoubtedly one of the most deprived areas of Cornwall. The project is good value for money for social and housing services, for the police and other local services. It is an excellent example of community empowerment and partnership and local regeneration.

Over the next five to ten years there will be a degree of uncertainty about the provision of and access to local services because of the changes to local government. The Partnership can provide a constant source of information and support to a needy community. There is likely to be a down turn in the economy and there almost certainly will be an energy price rise. The Partnership provides local access to advice and training for a deprived community who are most vulnerable to these national economic fluctuations.

The Partnership has experienced grass roots people who are good at communicating and working with public agencies, as well as the local community. They have a proven track record of good management, delivery and results, as well as commitment to achieving sustainability and a demonstrable need for their service.

Funding is required to bridge the gap between this review and the securing of a regular income from enterprise(s). Based on baseline calculations the Partnership has calculated its forecasted costs for the next 3 years. The costs of just the co-ordinator and the trainee administrator for 2009 are £36,000, and the centre costs are nearly £9,000.

This strategy, the strategy for 2008 - 2018, must be and is the strategy to self-sustainability. A community service and business which becomes less reliant on the support of key public agencies will sustain the development, support and inclusion of a community with multiple needs.

 

 

Background

In 1996 the Penwerris ward was ranked as the 6th most deprived ward in Cornwall and fell within the worst 10 wards in Cornwall for Income, Employment, Health, Housing and Child Poverty. In 1996 Penwerris, which included Old Hill and the Beacon estates, had:
• The highest proportion of ‘poor' households in the county
• 19/23 county child protection registrations
• 50% of homes without central heating
• 1/3 of households living in poverty
• Unemployment rates were 30 & the national average.

In recognition of the problems that existed in the ward, Penwerris received considerable support in the late 90's, mainly from the main social landlord, the Health & Housing Department of Carrick District Council.

"The two health visitors [for the area] expressed their feelings that things had to change as the area seemed to be spiralling out of control. They were overwhelmed by the issues people faced... [and] identified key people living in the area - residents who were considered to be fed up and brave who wanted to be different and who might be prepared to be part of the change process."

A partnership was formed in 1997 to support and administer the proceeds from the Capital Challenge Pilot Scheme Bid for Action for Energy of £1.2m (This was topped up by a further £1m by Carrick District Council). The bid by residents and Carrick District Council considerably enhanced the energy efficiency of housing in the area of Falmouth known as Old Hill and the Beacon (within Penwerris Ward). The funds were used to finance capital works to improve the energy efficiency of properties in Carrick with two-thirds of the resources targeted at the area and the remainder on privately-owned properties within the district as a whole. Further funding was obtained from Objective One and SRB to continue community development and capacity building work for another 3 years.

"..a process [began] which allowed the citizens to construct a new sense of self, resulting in new patterns of behaviour... residents moved from seeing themselves as "selves in isolation" to interdependent "selves in relation to others", where, for example, it could no longer be considered satisfactory to fail to act when witnessing vandalism on the estate."
Wyatt KM, Sweeney KG, Durie RH What makes a community healthy - describing the creation of a receptive context for health in a deprived housing estate

The beginning of the partnership
In May 1997 the Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership ("BCRP" or "the Partnership") was formed as a vehicle to unite agencies and community groups within a resident-controlled organisation. The purpose of this organisation is to continue the regeneration of the Penwerris ward, and to enable people living in the area to fully participate in the regeneration of: housing, infrastructure, the environment, community and social opportunities.

The Mission Statement of Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership is:

‘The Partnership will endeavour to develop sustainable projects that aim to improve the social, economic, physical and environmental quality of life for the whole community'

It was particularly noted, by the Partnership and statutory agencies involved on the Partnership, that relatively few people living on the estate used facilities based elsewhere in the Falmouth/Penryn area. This appears to have a number of causes: limited accessibility to public transport; low expectations; and the historically ‘self-contained' feeling of the area. In short, the Beacon area appears to see itself as isolated from the rest of Falmouth. People living in the area were not taking advantage of many of the services and facilities provided by both statutory and voluntary agencies.

The partnership established a community resource centre which enabled services to be delivered more directly to the area, and encouraged the burgeoning activities and forums that were beginning to emerge on the estates.

A staggering impact
Outcomes from the regeneration process 1997 - 2000:
• Breast feeding rates increased by 50%
• Postnatal depression rates down 77%
• Childhood accident rate down 50%
• Reduced incidence of asthma
• Child protection registrations down by 80%
• 40% drop in household burglaries-
• £2.2 million generated by tenants & residents, which paid for loft insulation and central heating, and, which had a subsequent fuel saving of £180,306

In addition, in 2001 Carrick Primary Care Trust and The Partnership opened the Beacon Care Centre, a joint venture facilitating community access to advice and care on health matters. The centre was managed for three years by a joint management committee between the two organisations which ensured that it continued to meet the needs of the local community on an on-going basis.

The Partnership has received many awards, these include the Queens Jubilee Award in 2003 and we were the winners of the first ODPM's Award for Sustainable Communities in 2004. On winning the ODPM's Sustainable Communities Award in 2003 one of the judges said

"If every neighbourhood in the country achieved as much activity as this, the benefit to the nation would be immense."

This led to the project co-ordinator, a longstanding local resident born on the estate, being invited to become a member of the 2005 judging panel for the ODPM's awards. The Partnership has also been visited by The Princess Royal, Right Honourable John Reid MP Secretary of State for Heath, Right Honourable Keith Hill MP Secretary of State for Housing.

 


The Partnership 2005 - 2007
The Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership (BCRP) has been funded over the last three years by Objective One, Carrick Housing Ltd, Carrick District Council and the South West Regional Development Agency. Employing one full time Project Co-ordinator, a Community Support Officer and a trainee general assistant, the Partnership has been able to continue supporting, advising and advocating for the community. The funding also covered the revenue costs, including rent and utilities, associated with the day to day running of the Beacon Community Resource Office. The Community Resource Centre is currently located at the heart of the estate alongside other local amenities such as the bakers and hairdressers.
In 2005 the Partnership expanded its area of operation in 2005 to the adjacent estates of Trescobeas and Laburnum.

The Partnership continues to play a critical role maintaining and improving relations between the major public service providers, education, health, police, housing and the local councils and the community. The Beacon Partnership consists of: Four Tenant and Resident groups (Penwerris TRA, Old Hill Community Association, Laburnum Close TRA, Oakfield and Acacia TRA) plus Devon and Cornwall Police, Falmouth Youth Club, Carrick District Council, Mid Cornwall Primary Care Trust, Falmouth primary School, with representatives from each forming the Partnership Committee. The management committee is formed from the four officers (Chairperson, Vice Chairperson, Secretary and Treasurer, working with one member from each tenant group).

Advocacy
The partnership's advocacy role explains the expectations and aspirations of the community to the public and private sector services and helps legitimise their actions to the community and by providing access to and contribution to the governance processes. The Partnership also monitors the quality and standards of services in the area ensuring they are community focused and value for money. Overall the partnership provides: a voice and leadership for a deprived community that would otherwise remain unheard.

The partnership's main activities are:

• Community Governance: Residents at the heart of all decisions and the community governing itself. This means supporting statutory agencies resulting in reduced crime, improved health, better housing and environment, improved educational output.

• Supporting the Community: Providing access to advice and information towards employment opportunities and formal and informal training; signposting a disadvantaged community towards the correct public service.

• Promoting Community Ownership: Co-ordinating and promoting environmental improvements that the community have participated in and have ownership of.

By acting as a conduit or vehicle to access Carrick's two most deprived communities, these activities have had a direct input into and impact on progressing statutory organisations' priorities and budgets.

Over the last few years BCRP have promoted the following to the local community:

Working with the Police (and Safety)
• Within the Penwerris Ward (Beacon, Penwerris and Old Hill estates) there was a sharp drop in the number of recorded crimes between 1997 and 2003. (Force Data Services, Devon & Cornwall Constabulary) This level of crime has plateaued and a close working relationship with the local police continues to effectively tackle the residue.
• BCRP promote the Neighbourhood watch scheme and security lighting; act as a daily drop in centre for both residents and Police officers, which enables the development of relationships of trust and thus flow of information.

Health
• BCRP have worked closely with the Beacon Care Centre, the Care Center provide: family mediation; sexual health education and advice - which has led to a reduction in teenage pregnancy within the ward; smoking cessation awareness; walking groups; reminiscing groups and ‘healthy living' courses.

Housing
• BCRP facilitate tenant participation and offer meeting space for resident Associations. They have enabled increased Housing Officer Access and visits (joined) with Police.
• BCRP have worked closely with Carrick Housing Ltd to work towards Decent Homes for all - improving energy efficiency and the installation of new kitchens and bathrooms. BCRP staff have acted as a community liaison between contractors and Carrick Housing to help with the installation process.

Education
• Cornwall County Council's Adult Education service provides many courses from the Resource Office, for example over 200 tenants and residents have received training in basic, CLAITS and CLAITS PLUS and EDLC computer courses.
• Additionally, In 2003 BCRP raised funding from ODPM to install a computer suite with Broadband internet access, which is opened for use by the residents and has been particularly focused towards school pupils for assisting with homework and developing IT Skills. Further funding was raised from the Falmouth Packet and the Centre has increased its opening hours to offer increased access in the evenings and weekends, together with supporting the development of a computer club.
• The Partnership employs a Trainee Administrator and gives the opportunity for day release into college to gain NVQ accreditation.

Social Services and inclusion
• The Centre provides a drop in facility for information and signposting to other services as well as an informal family/client mediation venue.
• We host community activity days, which encompass music/dance/sport/art skills workshops and promoting youth peer group interaction. Additionally, the Partnership annually hosts mosaic workshops to encourage interaction between the generations, which also involved agency personnel such as Police Officers and Carrick Housing staff. More than 60 residents have been involved with the mosaic courses, aged between 3yrs to 83yrs, since 2003.
• BCRP also act as a conduit for community projects i.e. skateboard park, Beacon Green area and has organised ‘Community Forum' information events.

Employment & Skills
• BCRP works closely with the Neighbourhood Pathways to Employment which is funded by Cornwall Neighbourhoods for Change to provide job seeking and training advice.
• The project employs a Project Co-ordinator, Community Support Officer and Trainee Administrator from the local community.
• Our activities have also supported local businesses, for example: through advertising in our community newsletter.
• Video Editing & IT suite promotes the development of new skills and is developing positive youth activity within the community i.e. D.Day and community video production.

Financial Inclusion and bringing money & resources in to the area
• Welfare and Benefits Advice services funded by Carrick Housing are offered from the Centre and have brought over £53,000 on average each year in benefits in the last 18 months.
• Promotion of Energy efficiency and recycling.
• BCRP produce a free bi-monthly community newsletter delivered to every house in the area, undertake consultation and act as a community voice
• BCRP also act as a conduit for community projects i.e. skateboard park, Beacon Green area and has organised ‘Community Forum' information events.
• Beacon Green Area consultation and other environmental improvements including: Dog & Litter bins, Lighting, Garden competitions, and road safety improvements

The Partnership is an integral part of achieving the outcomes of the Community Strategy in one of the most deprived areas of Cornwall. By promoting activities, education, employment and an improved environment the partnership contribute to the Community Strategy Vision of:
1. A Strong Local Economy
2. Strong Communities, and
3. A Quality Living Environment

The cost of the current project and activities per annum is £52,000 and current funding finishes 31st July 2008.

Pursuing sustainability, increasing enterprise

The Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership is a registered charity, and it aims to provide services and support to the tenants and residents of the Beacon area at little or no cost. In 2006 BCRP raised funding from Objective One and The National Lottery to establish a company limited by guarantee to support our objects and financial sustainability.

The Beacon Community Enterprise is run by the Beacon Partnership and any profit made by the company will be donated to the Beacon Community Regeneration Partnership. The Enterprise employs 3 local men (1 trainee) and provides handyman and garden services to the local community at a reduced price for council tenants.

At present the rules governing this funding do not allow a profit to be made. Therefore the earliest we forecast the Enterprise to make any profit will be 2010.
We are actively looking into extending our other business activities to increase profits to subsidise the partnerships work and to create further employment for the local community.

Our community in statistics
Funding and investment in the Beacon Estates have improved their deprivation ranking, but with a big concentration of social housing in a relatively small urban area, and increased competition for this housing by those with the most needs, this is unlikely to change greatly whilst Cornwall's increasing prosperity is slow to trickle down. The challenge is more likely to be to maintain the improvement that has been made over the last 10 years.

An area with multiple needs
In 1996 The Beacon estate(s) of the neighbourhoods of Beacon, Penwerris, Old Hill, Trescobeas and Laburnum were determined to be the most deprived ward in Cornwall . The (old) Penwerris ward had the highest number of poor households, half the homes had no central heating and the illness rate was well above the national average.

In the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) 2000 Penwerris still ranked poorly in all these areas. Falmouth was repeatedly in the worst 20 Travel To Work areas in the UK.

In 2003 ward boundary changes split the old Penwerris ward into Penwerris and Trescobeas. The Penwerris ward was extended to incorporate more affluent neighbourhoods in the south. Therefore, as well as the staggering impact of the Beacon Partnership, changes to the calculations of the IMD in 2004 and this boundary change may have contributed to Penwerris' new rank in the IMD 2004 (**insert rank).

2004 - 2007, a localised picture
In 2004 smaller ‘output' areas were created to localise data at a neighbourhood level. This split the Beacon estates into 5 areas categorised 011A - 011E.

011A = ‘Penwerris Ward Central'; Penwerris and Beacon neighbourhoods
011B = ‘Penwerris Ward East'; Symmons and Glasney
011C = ‘Penwerris South West'; South of Kimberly Park Road
011D = ‘Penwerris Ward North'; Old Hill and Penwerris neighbourhoods
011E = ‘Trescobeas Ward North'; Laburnum and Trescobeas neighbourhoods

In 2004 the output area ranks for Cornwall were (with 1 / 327 being the most deprived) the following:
Penwerris Central 34
Penwerris East 119
Penwerris South West 113
Penwerris North 9
Trescobeas North 19

In 2004 the Beacon Estates continued to suffer multiple deprivation, with 2 neighbourhoods in the 10% most deprived local areas in Cornwall. Very poor scores were still being recorded for income deprivation, health and education, and living environment in these 4 neighbourhoods.

In the IMD 2007, released in December that year, the Beacon Estates follow a statistical trend that seems to affect both Carrick and the whole of Cornwall with a small increase in deprivation rank across the indicators of education, income, employment, and health. The Living Environment ranks have improved slightly, and there are marked differences for the better and for worse in Crime and Housing. Theories on the reasons for these changes and trends are yet to be produced, but examining other local figures and statisticsmay be more beneficial.

The view from here; an area still in need
Crime in The Beacon Estates has been greatly reduced since the Partnership began. This has been due to a stronger working relationship with the Police as well as an improvement in the quality of life and community spirit. The majority of crimes are vehicle related or relating to an incident with someone the victim knows. Penwerris and Old Hill suffered 520 reported crimes from 2003- 2006 135 of which were damage to or theft from a vehicle. Laburnum and Trescobeas suffered 417 reported crimes from 2004 - 2007 92 of which was damage to or theft from a vehicle, and 103 were domestic protection incidents. According to the figures there is no particular concentration of crimes or incidents, however the derelict Tavern has attracted some vandalism and arson.

Employment and income fluctuates with the seasonal nature of coastal towns in Cornwall and Falmouth is no exception. The Beacon estates have a high number of adults on incapacity benefits compared to people seeking work, about 3 on Incapacity Benefit for every 1 seeking work. The area has a high number of people who identify that they can not work, and tackling this will be more resource intensive than supporting those who are seeking employment. From 2001 - 2006 the Job Seekers Persons count has been in correlation to the number of adult males in the area. This may be because Falmouth's largest sector is retail and hospitality, which has traditionally been favoured by women seeking employment.

Many people in the community are not claiming the full amount of benefits they are entitled to, which is contributing to income poverty. Over the last 3 years, by providing a local venue the Beacon Partnership has helped achieve:
• A total of £110,674.03 in extra benefits
• 10 blue badge application forms
• 15 Working Tax credit applications


In 2005 Pupils from the Beacon Estates were still underperforming against the national GCSE results by nearly 10% and by over 10% in English and Mathematics. 26% of pupils did not achieve a GCSE in English or Mathematics in 2005.

 

 

2007 Strategic Consultation and review

In 2007 the Partnership celebrated its 10 year anniversary. The culmination of agreed major changes to local council structure and the end of key funding in 2008 prompted a strategic review for the Partnership. This review incorporated a reassessment of the Partnership's objects and activities as well as purpose for being.
Tenants and residents' priorities - summaries of each of the four Neighbourhood Plans for the area
From October 2006 - December 2007 the Partnership Tenants and Residents Association members each developed and produced a neighbourhood plan. These plans outlined a vision for the future of their neighbourhood and identified key issues and measures to be addressed. At the end of each plan is an action plan that details the first steps to achieving the vision. Each TRA consulted with the residents that they represent about their priorities for improving and developing the neighbourhood. A total of 349 households responded.
Laburnum
Laburnum had 70 households in their neighbourhood respond to their survey, about 69%

The vision for Laburnum is
"A clean and tidy neighbourhood with an appearance that residents' are proud of, and is safe and easy for residents to walk around"
The priority measures are:

• Giving the neighbourhood a brighter and more attractive physical appearance
• Improving access and safety through better signage and visibility

Laburnum TRA have begun progressing their plan by liaising with Carrick Housing to:
1. agree an outdoor block painting scheme
2. clean and renovate the outdoor drying area
3. paint white edging on the outdoor steps

They have been successful in achieving funding for new easy-use washing lines.

Old Hill
Old Hill had 25 households in their neighbourhood respond to their survey, about 25%.

The vision for Old Hill is
"A safe and clean neighbourhood for residents to enjoy"
The priority measures are:
• Improving the cleanliness of the area and the look of the flats
• More activities for the youths
• Address the ongoing speeding issues around the estate
• Investigate renewable energy systems to provide further lighting in the dark lanes

Old Hill Community Association have begun progressing their plan by raising funding from Carrick Housing to
1. Install solar lighting in the lanes
2. Provide new litter and dog bins
3. Support the development of the new Dracaena Centre

Penwerris
Penwerris had 149 households in their neighbourhood respond to their survey, about 17%.

The vision for Penwerris is
"A brighter and safer future for all in Penwerris"
The priority measures are:
• Pathways maintenance
• Lighting
• The Dracaena Community Centre
For younger people:
• Litter

Penwerris TRA has begun to progress their plan by raising funds from Carrick Housing to
1. Install a youth shelter
2. Provide further dog and litter bins

Trescobeas
Trescobeas had 95 households in their neighbourhood respond, which is about 16%.

The vision for Trescobeas is
"A safe, friendly community with neighbourhood activities"
The priority measure is:
• To re-model the estate to improve parking, reduce concealed areas and improve housing

OATTRA have applied for funding to improve key physical aspects of their neighbourhood to progress their plan.

The Common Themes in the four neighbourhood plans
The common themes that featured throughout the plans are illustrated on the table at Appendix 2. The areas common to all four plans fall into three main categories:
1. Active communities (Community areas, recycling, composting)
2. Better by design (Road layout, unused areas, energy measures)
3. Neighbourhood services (maintenance and caretaking)

Activity surveys
The Voice
During 2007 the partnership undertook a survey of the tenants who received the Voice. Every road was visited and two or three houses picked at random and asked if they would help complete the survey.

The result out of the houses visited was as follows:
4 reported they did not receive the Voice. (This was identified as a distribution problem between two volunteers which was subsequently rectified)
5 request more information on events around the other tenant groups. (All tenant groups ask to keep us up to date with their events)
2 claimed it was junk mail and asked not to be on the delivery list. (No delivery at these addresses since the survey) Note both these people were not Carrick tenants and considered it not to affect them)
The remaining 79 houses reported that they read and enjoyed the Voice, found it very informative with much useful contact details for other services.
On being asked what we could do to improve the Voice, the majority said that it should stay the same.
The IT Suite
In 2007 consultation took place with 30 users of the IT suite which confirmed that there is still a need for this facility. The people interviewed told us that many of them have home computers but lack broadband or an internet facility. Many of the younger users of the suite made the point that being able to join with their friends in a group instead of being alone at home made the process of learning on the internet much more fun as they could all work together. The suite is still well used by the adults during the day, averaging 3 or 4 people per day many of which use it for research, job seeking and CV writing.
Agencies and stakeholders
In October 2007 the Partnership invited agencies to attend a conference to discuss the future of the Beacon neighbourhoods. They were consulted about the key issues of:
• Environmental Sustainability
• Strategic Development & Economic Sustainability
• Facilities & Access to Services
• Residential Development
• Crime & Nuisance Behaviour

Representatives participated from:
• Falmouth Beacon School
• Falmouth Community School
• SWRDA
• Carrick District Council
• Carrick Housing
• Devon & Cornwall Police
• CCC PTE (Highways)
• CCC Family Services
• CCC Adult Services
• Cornwall Primary Care Trust
• CYP Partnership
• Coastline
• Beacon Enterprise Ltd
• Cornwall Sustainable Energy Partnership
• Cornwall Enterprise
Summary of current issues for the area
Crime & Nuisance Behaviour
Crime is relatively low in the area this year, but nuisance and antisocial behaviour is prevalent. Free running has become popular on The Beacon. The idea behind free running is the thrill of jumping over hedges, climbing up walls and jumping off garage roofs etc. This is extremely anti social when done on an estate where there are lots of families and elderly people. The group agreed that there needs to be more challenging activities for the young people.

CCTV is not the best deterrent for crime on the estate. Where there are individual incidents, CCTV may be appropriate. The Partnership needs to look at the reasons why ASB is being caused, and what can be done to address these root causes.

Residents report buses and taxis as the main speeding offenders. Residents should look out for their taxi badge numbers, and then report it to the council. The Partnership should also be in contact with the bus company to inform them of this. A flashing speed sign can help, but the crucial element of crime reduction is enforcement against repeat offenders.

Community Cohesion & Challenging Families
Elderly isolation and fear of crime is an issue on The Beacon. Projects to facilitate communication and developing joint understanding are a priority.

Challenging families are prevalent on the estates and can suffer from stigmatisation. The Partnership should facilitate all agencies working together to resolve issues and no family should be classed as ‘beyond help'.

Access to Facilities & Services
A lack of affordable, suitable swimming facilities is a key concern in the area. Many residents say that the Ships and Castles is too far away with only one bus service and too expensive, it is a fun pool and not really suitable for promoting serious exercise. Under the national curriculum all school children are entitled to swimming lessons. Only year 6 pupils receive swimming lessons as the school budget cannot stretch any further. Facilities are needed which are not age restricted. Family Services are hoping to run subsidised swimming sessions. Previous sports activities provided in the area have proved to have been popular although young people can be difficult to engage with. It can be very difficult to attract volunteers within the community to help to supervise events unless there is an incentive or reward.

Lack of communication between agencies needs to be addressed. Several of the agencies have heard of the Beacon Partnership but only a few have strong ideas of what we do. Although the partnership produces a newsletter every two months which is hand delivered to nearly 1600 homes in the area, due to a high turnover of tenants and residents in the area, many are unaware of what the partnership does.

Environmental Sustainability
The Carrick council communities recognise that the recycling collection service could be improved to help encourage households to recycle more and waste less. The service has identified these neighbourhoods as high level ‘recyclers' and so has not targeted action in these areas. However, these neighbourhoods have identified wasting less as a key priority and are keen to work together to make the service more effective. The Partnership could facilitate an education and service improvement programme. Young people need to be involved in environmental issues from an early age to enable people to grow up and treat recycling and energy saving methods as the norm.

The Beacon is an area of fuel poverty . As retro-fitting measures and systems would be costly and difficult, education on saving energy is needed.

Economic Sustainability & Financial Inclusion
Borrowing from unofficial lenders is a wide spread problem in The Beacon. The Cornwall wide credit union should be able to lend earlier than the district credit unions could, however, Falmouth credit union has not joined the Cornwall wide credit union. About 1/3 of The Partnership enquiries are debt advice. The neighbourhoods need local debt advice as it can be a long wait for access to the Citizens Advice Bureau.

CUC has recruited from outside the area, degrees are needed for low paid admin jobs in Cornwall! Local university: is it ex/inclusivity? BCRP made links with the university through projects i.e. sourcing a BMX team. Could CUC & BCRP work together to develop incubation & move on units with potential employees coming from the Beacon? Could more networking go on between students and residents - business opportunities? To raise expectation and aspirations The Beacon needs to introduce enterprise at junior school level. Do the school and CUC link?

Cornwall Action Team (CAT) were very successful in the Beacon office. Pathways and sure start have worked from the estate but not with the success of CAT. CAT had the funding, tools and flexibility to support and resource individuals into work immediately. Cornwall works is aiming to reduce incapacity benefit. But, are the residents willing to work? Some choose to stay on benefits. The Partnership needs to facilitate the development of self-esteem, capacity and confidence.

The Falmouth & Penryn action plan seeks to invest in the knowledge based economy, education, IT, research and development, designer manufacturing. There needs to be more communication locally about planning and preparing for the economic future, about the changing industry and what is needed. The Partnership should hold discussions with CUC about what industries and technologies are emerging. The future of the dockyard is vital to the neighbourhoods, but it will need to diversify. Could The partnership build a relationship or partnership with the Docks?

The Partnership needs a large funded project to ensure sustainability of the organisation, other similar organisations have an asset. Re-developing the Falmouth tavern site? Developing a land trust? Managing the Draceana Centre? A financial advice centre? Managing the shops on Acacia? The Partnerships future funding needs an asset to create an income for core funding.

Developing Housing
Demand for all affordable housing is very high across Carrick. Demand for 2/3 bedroom properties is highest in the area but there is demand for 4 and for 1 bedroom.
Gardens could be used for 2 small properties instead of 1 large one, but planning issues and parking is a problem. Also, 4 bedroom homes can exacerbate the parking situation. There is capacity for building extensions site-specifically. There is pressure everywhere - losing front boundary walls presents other issues. Developing 1 bedroom homes for local young people and older people down-sizing from 2/3 bedroom is desirable. We need a mix of tenure but we need more housing. 4 bedroom properties are not more likely to be bought because they are more expensive.

Developing housing and parking/traffic congestion needs to be examined in tandem. Parking in gardens may need planning permission because of the dropped curb. If there is a design code for new developments would the whole Beacon community could voluntarily sign up? We should do what we can to build in good neighbourliness - i.e. motorised scooter and buggy sheds. What about the marina - house barges and floating blocks?

There is a conflict between cars and pedestrians in the Beacon. Changing surfaces and pinch points can help slow traffic. Could the community ask the business park on the Vospers site if they could park work vehicles there? What about a local smart car hire scheme to help people who only want the occasional car use? (scheme in Dorset). Car sharing should be encouraged.

Having some allotments that people opt into are better than bigger gardens. However, the space between housing is also valuable as density causes friction. Allotments need to be overlooked, in the middle. The nearest allotments are Swanvale. Home shopping and reducing journeys by car should be encouraged. The public realm is poor at Trescobeas shops i.e. the high pavement. The area could make a local shopping hub, room for co-operative shops selling local goods. Vegetable boxes for families have been partly successful.
Priorities of agencies and stakeholders for the area
According to agencies and stakeholders, the priorities that the Partnership should tackle over the next 10 years are:

AIM Objectives
NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTIVITIES & INCLUSION
Create greater access to facilities and activities for children & young people, and adults from the Beacon community Better access to swimming facilities and lessons
Support the schools to provide comprehensive after schools programmes
Increase activities for older young people
Increase activities for the whole family that develop numeracy and literacy
Provide support and training to carers in the community, including young carers
Increase access to NHS dentist
Ensure Dracaena Centre developed to full potential
Outreach activity co-ordinator for Dracaena Centre (to include adult and elderly) and Beacon Junior School
Improved communication between the Beacon Partnership and members and stakeholders,
leading to improved support for challenging households Regular agency consultations regarding current clients and community trends
Improve the productivity of BCRP meetings
Engage the partnership with the development of local planning and economic development
Improve communication to members
Improve public transport in the Beacon Install more bus and taxi shelters
Reduce financial exclusion Reduce/ prevent digital exclusion (inc. through financial exclusion)
Reduce / prevent digital exclusion through ICT
Increased relevance of credit union
Increase employment and employability
DEVELOPING COMMUNITIES
The community is involved in creating more appropriate housing and improved neighbourhoods Involve residents in the re-modelling of the Falmouth Tavern Area any other areas inc. in the Trescobeas area
Create an allotments site within the Beacon neighbourhoods
Improve the public realm of the neighbourhoods
Increase water efficiency
Increase recycling of household waste
Increase take up of home shop schemes
Ensure self-sufficiency of the BCRP project, whilst pursuing and developing the key aims of the partnership Secure a local building or asset that can be managed by BCRP and on which local residents can be trained to be business managers

BCRP members & stakeholders to use knowledge and skills to gain short term funding
Develop and expand BCE team

The activities and actions that were identified as needed measures in the Beacon area over the next 10 years are detailed in the table at Appendix 3.

Analysis
Partnership review (purpose, membership, activities)
Purpose

The Partnership's constitutional objectives are:

"To develop the capacity and skills of the members of the socially and economically disadvantaged community of the Beacon Action Area in Falmouth in such a way that they are better able to identify, and help meet, their needs and to participate more fully in the society.

The advancement of public education and the provision of recreation and leisure time facilities in the interest of social welfare with the object of improving the conditions of life of the inhabitants of the Beacon Action Area in Falmouth and to or for such charitable purpose as the trustees shall decide."

At the Partnership's AGM in November 2007 the members agreed that the Partnership's objectives are still valid and an accurate record of what their purpose is and should be.

Membership

The Partnership further agreed that their membership: of the four TRA's, Carrick District Council, Cornwall County Council, the Primary Care Trust, and Falmouth Primary School is fair. It was deemed desirable, and not essential, to further engage with relevant departments within the Cornwall Council as well as Falmouth Town Council.


Activities

The partnership committee members had been involved developing the strategy. The only other area of strategic priority for future activity that they identified was a focus on activities and support for Parenting and Caring rather than or as well as on children and youth activities. The Partnership also reviewed the effectiveness of its business and meetings. As a result the Partnership meetings will:

1. Resume the inclusion of management business

2. Each have a priority theme for discussion, to which key speakers/ representatives will be invited
SWOT analysis
Strengths Maximise Further Action
1. Experienced people

2. Communicating with Falmouth based agencies (police-fire-school)

3. Proven track record - evidence of good management

4. Commitment & demonstrable sustainability
• Conferences and mentoring of other communities and organisations

• Open regular dialogues with parish council, planning officers and others on specific issues • Talk to Convergence about suitability as an exchange team
• Talk to LC about being SW RI Champion
• Identify agency liaison officers
• Create monthly meeting timetable for issues/agencies
Weaknesses Minimise
1. No new blood

2. Not business minded enough

3. Communicating with social services

4. Rely/ lean on the co-ordinator, who does the partnerships work

5. Lack of member empowerment and/ or training
• More outreach activities to engage new & variety of residents

• Manage the operation more business-like

• Include regular dialogue as core activity

• More development activities and training • Funding to recruit specific co-ordinator
• Funding to provide basic learning activities through fun and family learning
• Re-budget projects to include the appropriate proportion of staff time & over heads
• Recruit volunteers to get work experience of ‘running a business'
• Further business orientated training and visits to other orgs
Opportunities Capitalise
1. Sharing with others

2. Bigger premises and resources

3. Unitary

4. Convergence As above
• Dialogue with FYC & RDA
• Make case to CDC & then One Cornwall re: community network model?
• Dialogue with CUC & RDA As above
• Visit and discuss specific ideas/issues
• Present strategy back to agencies in April 08

Threats Combat
1. Funding

2. Convergence

3. Unitary

4. Getting distracted - losing our purpose/direction
• Make business case to public services that they need & want to be working with us
• Annual work plan for partnership meetings
• Review in 2010 • Identify professional who can calculate the savings made to various agencies

 

PEST analysis
Political Community effect BCRP response

Unitary change


Increased uncertainty. Need for constant & information

Membership change & services change, funding?


Change in government
Reduced benefits, rising unemployment?

Increase in support from BCRP needed locally
Economic Community BCRP

Oil/energy price rise


Poorer, increased crime, reduced health, lack of access to facilities

Increase in debt & employment advice provided locally.


No post office

No post office banking/ pay points
Provide local pay points, or community banking

Social Community BCRP

Charging for waste


Increased cost = fly-tipping and dumping
Increased liaison with council

Higher demand for housing

More vulnerable tenants, elderly & children
Increase welfare services & local resources

Technological Community BCRP

Online shopping only

Debts through increase in borrowing & need for debit/credit card
Provide community or local banking scheme & internet access as well as increased debt advice


Mandatory ID Cards


Increased need for welfare assistance with mandatory paperwork. Risk of fraud.

Liaison with Cornwall centre to become an outreach support post


In summary, over the next five to ten years there will be a degree of uncertainty about the provision of and access to local services because of the changes to local government. BCRP can provide a constant source of information and support to a needy community. There is likely to be a down turn in the economy and there almost certainly will be an energy price rise. BCRP provides local access to advice and training for a deprived community who are most vulnerable to these national economic fluctuations. If the high turnover* of the community continues, there is a need for regular ongoing resources to up skill and train new residents.
As demand for housing increases tenants will have a higher level or variety of needs and local support and information will help agencies cope with these demographic changes in an area of a relatively high concentration of council tenants. The need for debt advice and welfare benefit advice from BCRP will rise, and increasing the basic skills base of the local community will be crucial if the area is not to continue to languish at the top of the deprivation table.
3 - 5 year core budget forecasting
Based on baseline calculations the Partnership has forecast its costs for the next 3 years. The costs of just the co-ordinator and the trainee administrator for 2009 are £36,000, and the centre costs are nearly £9,000.

Jul 2008> 2009 2010 > Jun 2011
Overheads/Utilities Total Total Total Total 3Yr Total

Insurances 600.00 618.00 661.00 1,879.00

Water 114.00 232.00 240.00 122.00 708.00

Electricity 424.00 860.00 886.00 450.00 2,620.00

Telephone/ Internet 500.00 1,016.00 1,046.00 530.00 3,092.00

Cleaning / Toilet Equipment 40.00 82.00 86.00 44.00 252.00

Alarm System Rental 190.00 196.00 200.00 586.00

Stationery & office supplies 200.00 509.00 618.00 412.00 1,739.00

Photcopier, copy costs & servicing 80.00 162.00 166.00 84.00 492.00

Rent 1,738.00 3,528.00 3,634.00 1,844.00 10,744.00

Electrical Testing Certificate 250.00 258.00 266.00 774.00

Data Protection 35.00 36.00 37.00 108.00

Accountancy & Book Keeping 900.00 927.00 954.00 2,781.00

Total Revenue 5,071.00 8,424.00 8,794.00 3,486.00 25,775.00

Total Total Total Total 3Yr Total
Staff
Full-time Co-ordinator 9,000.00 18,405.00 18,957.00 9,548.00 55,910.00

Full-time Trainee costs 3,953.94 8,085.78 8,328.08 4,194.54 24,562.34

Oncosts - NI 4,600.00 9,407.00 9,761.00 4,928.00 28,696.00

Total 17,553.94 35,897.78 37,046.08 18,670.54 109,168.34

Mileage 265.23 542.35 558.59 285.56 1,651.73

110,820.07
Cost-benefit analysis

The cost of the current project and activities per annum is £52,000. This includes the wages of the Project Co-ordinator, the Community Support Officer, and the trainee administrator, as well as the annual cost of The Resource Centre.

The Welfare Benefit Service has brought in an average of £55,337 in extra income benefits to the community. The value of referral to debt counselling and legal advice cannot be calculated, but is still a very valuable resource in one of the most deprived communities in Cornwall. Based on this comparison alone, the project is good value for money for social and housing services, for the police and other local services.

Cost options analysis
The following partnership management options for the future of the Beacon Partnership have been considered by the development committee:


1. Not to seek any further funding and to close the partnership.

Conclusion
 Closing the partnership resource office would allow the estate to decline back into the poor condition of crime, lack of community spirit, alienation from services and increased multiple deprivation.

Decision
 To continue to actively seek funding for the next three years and to further develop our business arm (Beacon Enterprise) to assist sustainability.

2. To attempt to refund the Partnership

Conclusion:
 The refunding of the Partnership is the only option; but to make the most of any funding received a full audit of our present costs must be carried out. This is to include reviewing the need for each member of staff.

Decision
 To seek funds from Carrick Housing, Carrick District Council and private funders to run the partnership for a further three years. Amount of funding required to be determined after the analysis of staff requirement and a full audit of other overheads.
Needs analysis

The Resource Centre
The Resource Centre provides a cost effective venue for both the Partnership and partner agencies and services, which can use it free of charge for mediation and alike. The £10,000 annual running cost equates to about £40 per working day. The small IT suite is crucial to serve and support a community without access to broadband, and to encourage service access from children, young people and adults who use the suite for pc gaming, socialising and research.

The Community Resource Centre is ideally located to serve the needs of the Beacon, Penwerris and Old Hill estates. However, parking can be difficult and further resources need to be located in the middle of Penwerris and Trescobeas, and perhaps a small centre in the Trescobeas neighbourhood.

The Project Co-ordinator
Having been involved in developing and managing the Partnership for over 11 years, the Project Co-ordinator has a huge amount of knowledge and experience. This post has been instrumental in attracting and managing grant funding as well as building relationships with other services and agencies.

The Community Support Officer
This role is instrumental in dealing with enquiries and managing visits. The post is currently reactive; supporting projects as required, and responding to street enquiries. We have considered that we could both manage without this post or make it more beneficial to our needs. Opportunities to train staff as first point of contact income and employment advisors could develop this role and be more cost effective for partners looking to provide this service to our community. In examining future needs and priorities this role could also become more proactive with different hours and activities working with and reaching out to different groups in the different neighbourhoods of The Beacon Estates.

The Trainee Administrator
The Trainee Administrator is crucial to the success of the Beacon Enterprise and provides much needed office cover. We have identified a need to proportion more of the costs of the administrator to the Enterprise Project, and can begin to apportion these from July 2008. A funding gap for £7,000 per year to support the trainee administrator has been identified and must be resolved.

Staff
All posts have been recruited from the local community. Because a number of committee members help by voluntarily staffing the office, a minimum of 2 full time staff are required to ensure worker safety and a reasonable level of customer service. However, to ensure the office can be open during office hours for 50 weeks of the year, 3 full time staff members is desirable. From 2008 the Partnership will begin to apportion staff time and overheads into all project costs, this will reflect a truer cost of each project and contribute to sustainability.

 

Going Forward Together
Conclusions
To date the Partnership has brought in nearly £1m in additional funding to undoubtedly one of the most deprived areas of Cornwall. The project is good value for money for social and housing services, for the police and other local services. It is an excellent example of community empowerment and partnership and local regeneration.

Over the next five to ten years there will be a degree of uncertainty about the provision of and access to local services because of the changes to local government. The Partnership can provide a constant source of information and support to a needy community. There is likely to be a down turn in the economy and there almost certainly will be an energy price rise. The Partnership provides local access to advice and training for a deprived community who are most vulnerable to these national economic fluctuations.

The Partnership has experienced grass roots people who are good at communicating and working with public agencies, as well as the local community. They have a proven track record of good management, delivery and results, as well as commitment to achieving sustainability and a demonstrable need for their service.

Funding is required to bridge the gap between this review and the securing of a regular income from enterprise(s). This strategy, the strategy for 2008 - 2018, must be the strategy to self-sustainability. A community service and business which becomes less reliant on the support of key public agencies will be an omen and example to a community of multiple needs.
What we must do
Expanding our operation across the Beacon Estates
The Partnership has agreed to support one of our TRA members, OATTRA, to open a small resource centre in the heart of Trescobeas. This venue will provide a meeting space for the group and partners as well as a venue (by negotiation) for partner agencies to hold surgeries and advice sessions. The Partnership will provide support to the Falmouth Youth Club in the development and delivery of the Draceana Community Centre.

Reducing core costs
The management committee have considered various options to reduce the cost of funding the partnership. As approximately 85% of our funding is spent on wages this was one of our main lines of investigation. After investigating all staff workload and estimating the future need for staff if we are successful in refunding the partnership the development committee decided to, retain the post of Project Co-ordinator, and office trainee. The post of Community Support Officer would be ended on the 31st of July 2008. The member of staff affected by this change has been consulted during the process, and is aware that the post will be ended in July. A further audit of our overheads have allowed some cuts in various budget, which in effect will cut the running cost of the project by 5% on the last three years funding.

Communicating effectively
The Partnership meetings will resume the inclusion of management business, and each meeting will have a priority theme for discussion, to which key speakers/ representatives from partners will be invited. A programme of reaching out to partners will also be enacted by the Project Co-ordinator.

The free newsletter to tenants will be continued, and developed with a further emphasis on financial sustainability of the project through local advertising, and information about the Beacon partnership itself. A compact will be created to communicate to; agencies, residents, and stakeholders, what we can do for and with them.

Improving Services
We will work with current and future service delivery agents, like the waste and recycling collection services, to improve services and information about access and provision.

Neighbourhood Activities for All
We will work in partnership with public services and recruit an outreach officer to provide more activities to promote family learning, education and social welfare through art, sport and outdoor activities. We will continue the provision of the IT suite and ITC learning and work with the Draceana Centre to provide greater provision in this area.

Better by Design
We will raise funds to lead on a design code for the Beacon estates, and work with public agencies to ensure our neighbourhoods are physically improved and meet the needs of current and future residents; reducing crime; increasing appropriate housing; and reducing our impact on the environment.

Pursuing sustainability, increasing enterprise
We will pursue the sustainability of the partnership by building on the success of our current projects and increasing our enterprise portfolio. Over the next 5 years we will develop our evidence base of successful management and development of enterprise and seek to secure a local physical asset to provide dividends to the partnership. This could is likely to include a variety of options with one large building management project.

Continue to be flexible and adaptable
We will meet the changing requirements of our community and commit to continuing to be flexible to circumstance, responsive to needs.

A decade of action
2008
Raise funding for:
• Core Partnership costs
• The development of the Voice project
• A masterplan and design code for the Beacon Estates
• An outreach activities co-ordinator
Staff trained to deliver first stop income and employment advice
Compact for residents and partners created
Resident consultation and involvement in Masterplanning project
Activities for young people increased.
Beacon Enterprise raises a profit.
2009
Support to Falmouth Youth Club to manage the Draceana Centre
Support One Cornwall to inform and engage with residents
Discussions with SWRDA, CUC, One Cornwall, Carrick Housing, and Falmouth Town Council to identify sustainability project.
Beacon Enterprise raises a profit and contributes to BCRP.
2010
Further core project costs sought
2011
Beacon Enterprise profit able to support the basic core funding
2012
Applications for sustainability project begin and support sought
2013
Applications for sustainability project submitted
2014
Secure funding for major income revenue enterprise
2018
Self-sufficiency achieved


Impact assessment and output forecast for 2008 - 2013
Employment sustained: 5.5 F/T
Small Businesses sustained: 2 x not-for profit
Community resource centres sustained: 3
Further funding brought into community: £200,000
Further benefits and income for residents: £424,456.66
Residents involved in community re-design: 200
Residents involved in health awareness activities: 500
Residents involved in exercise and well-being activities: 250
Children & Young people involved in exercise and wellbeing activities: 400
Residents accessing ICT training: 80
Residents accessing welfare benefit and financial advice: 65
Residents using ICT suites: 250

 

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Target

Raise funding for core partnership costs

The development of the Voice project

A masterplan and design code for Beacon area

An outreach activities co-ordinator

Staff trained to deliver first stop income and employment advice
Resident consultation and involvement in master planning project

Discussions with partners and funders about sustainability

Activities for young people increased

Beacon Enterprise raises a profit and contributes to BCRP

Support Falmouth Youth Club to manage Draceana

Sustainability project development and achieved

Appendices
Appendix 1 - Graphs and statistical evidence

 

Appendix 2 - the neighbourhood plans common theme table

Parking Path & street Lighting Path maintenance Play area improvement Fencing Allotments Dog bins Litter bins Improved Recycling Water butts Water measures Energy measures Community centre Community activities Youth activities Estate caretaker Police Traffic calming Overgrown.. composting Unused land Road layout and access Bulk Rubbish
Laburnum
Old Hill
Penwerris
Trescobeas


Appendix 3 - Results of agency & stakeholder consultation: priorities and measures for the Beacon area
AIM Objectives Measures Activities Partners
NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTIVITIES & INCLUSION
Create greater access to facilities and activities for children & young people, and adults from the Beacon community Better access to swimming facilities and lessons Create partnership with local hotel facility • Research facilities
• Research transport
• Discussions with hotel managers
• Support from partners • Falmouth Primary School
• Falmouth School
• Family Services
• Falmouth & Penryn Parent Group
• Falmouth Youth Club
• Healthy Living Initiative
• YOT
• Cornwall Council
• Adult Services
Support the schools to provide comprehensive after schools programmes Create partnership with the two schools to retain dialogue about needs • Promote to and recruit stakeholders to engage i.e. as governors or Friends of Falmouth Primary School
• Create training programme to develop sports and activity coaches
Increase activities for older young people Create partnerships with sports and arts providers • Plymouth Argyle football
• TR11 dance project
• Flashpoint & free running projects
Increase activities for the whole family that develop numeracy and literacy Engage with suitable partner organisation • CN4C
• Job Centre
• Cornwall Works
• Rethink
Provide support and training to carers in the community, including young carers Facilitate information and access for partner agencies • DAAT
• Inclusion Cornwall
Increase access to NHS dentist Partnership with PCT and local dentists • Promote opportunity for access to members
• Liaise with PCT about increasing access
Ensure Dracaena Centre developed to full potential Improve communication with Falmouth Youth Club • Engage major agencies to ensure project success
• Support communication to community and stakeholders
Outreach activity co-ordinator for Dracaena Centre (to include adult and elderly) and Beacon Junior School Raise funding from local agency or national funding pot • Research whether outreach co-ordinator could train local people (qual)
• Research funding
Improved communication between the Beacon Partnership, members and stakeholders.
And improved support to challenging households Regular agency consultations regarding current clients and community trends Agree regular communications with front line agency staff • Arrange to visit teams
• Arrange for frontline staff to visit the Beacon office • D&C Police
• YOT
• Family Services
• Social Services
• PCT (health visitors)
• Carrick Housing
• Cornwall Council
• Job centre
• Cornwall Works
• Falmouth town Council
Improve the productivity of BCRP meetings Review the structure and content of the Partnership meetings and business • Identify issue specific/ themed meetings
• Create biannual program and invite accordingly
Engage the partnership with the development of local planning and economic development Be proactive in approaching agencies • Re-engage with all planning bodies
• Identify • RDA/SWRA
• GOSW
• Cornwall Council
• Falmouth Town Council
Improve communication to members Improve the information in The Voice • Ensure sustainability through local advertising
• Encourage greater use by agencies
• Include standard information about the Beacon Partnership and its history
Improve public transport in the Beacon Install more bus and taxi shelters Liaise with Cornwall Council and Town council • Initiate discussions regarding increasing shelters
• Seek extra shelters • Cornwall Council
• Falmouth Town Council
• Cornwall Transport Partnership
• D&C Police
Reduce financial exclusion Reduce/ prevent digital exclusion (inc. through financial exclusion) Partner with a digital equipment provider and educate members • Research changes
• Research providers
• Create partnership with a provider
• Education/ information project
Reduce / prevent digital exclusion through ICT Continue to provide facilities and training from the Beacon resource centre & provide further facilities at other locations across area • Sustain/ find funding to continue the ICT & training resource
• Create small suite at Trescobeas
• Create small suite in Dracaena • Act Now (RDA)
• Family Services
• Adult Services
Increased relevance of credit union Promote improved credit union, accessed locally • Liaise with Falmouth & Cornwall Credit Unions to try and resolve differences and increase relevance to Beacon members • Cornwall Works
Increase employment and employability Train BCRP staff and volunteers to deliver employment and benefits advice • Continue discussions with agencies to agree measures • Cornwall Works
• CN4C
DEVELOPING COMMUNITIES
The community is involved in creating more appropriate housing and improved neighbourhoods Involve residents in the re-modelling of the Falmouth Tavern Area any other areas inc. in the Trescobeas area Liaise with Carrick Housing to examine the feasibility of re-modelling these areas • Discussions with Carrick Housing about timescale & feasibility
• Be a facilitator and communication portal for the community • Carrick Housing
• Cornwall Council
• Falmouth Town Council
Create an allotments site within the Beacon neighbourhoods Liaise with Carrick Housing and Cornwall Council to identify suitable sites • Discussions re: feasibility
• Consultation with members to test desirability
• Identify and raise funding
Improve the public realm of the neighbourhoods Public realm improvement project in Old Hill & Acacia • Discussions with agencies
• Press for priority improvement of Acacia cladding
• Raise or identify funding
Poor condition private gardens strategy • Research other council enforcement strategies
• Test feasibility
• Encourage Cornwall Council to adopt
Reduce speeding vehicles across the estate • Secure funding for flashing speed sign
• Safe routes to school project
• Educational campaign
• Liaise with public transport & police
Increased water efficiency Water efficiency promotion project to include being a test bed for retro fitting grey water systems • Research water recycling systems
• Raise funding to be a water ‘beacon'
• Undertake project to encourage reducing water wastage
• Give out free water butts and measuring metres • Carrick Housing
• Cornwall Council
• CSEP
• The Eden Project
Increased recycling of household waste Free containers with extra literature and education activities regarding what can and cannot be recycled • Liaise with the council regarding service standards of collectors - agree charter
• Secure resources for education programme and containers
Increased take up of home shop schemes Increased promotion of scheme • Liaise with possible providers including Asda & Co-op
• Promote home shop schemes • Local shops
• Cornwall Council
Ensure self-sufficiency of the BCRP project, whilst developing the key aims of the partnership Secure a local building or asset that can be managed by BCRP and on which local residents can be trained to be business managers move on accommodation for nearly new business from CUC • Further discussions with the RDA
• Begin discussions with CUC • RDA
• GOSW
• Cornwall Council
• CUC
• Convergance Team
• Falmouth town Council
Offices & surgery space for public sector services • Identify possibility of developing 1st floor of Dracaena
BCRP members & stakeholders to use knowledge and skills to gain short term funding Mentor other communities and agencies to successfully engage residents in regeneration • Create training programme that can be provided
• Scope conferencing and mentoring
• Test pilot to see if good rate of return • TPAS
• CIH
• RDA
• GOSW
• Carrick Housing
• Cornwall Council
Develop and expand BCE team Train/supervise and mentor apprentices working with other businesses • Identify key areas BCRP and BCE team can support other businesses to ensure apprentices access wider training an development • Cornwall Council
• Carrick Housing
• Cornwall Enterprise
• GOSW
• RDA
• Chamber of Commerce